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Childhood Obesity

My goal for this infographic was to help people become aware of the alarming rates of childhood obesity with just a few key numbers. As a nation, obesity is a huge problem for many adults, and poses even more threats to children.

I really care about health and fitness, so I figured out fairly early that fitness would be my focus for the infographic. I looked into different health statistics, and was struck by the statistics about childhood obesity in the United States. I used “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2010,” a report on obesity done by healthyamerica.org, and double-checked the facts with other sources.

I employed the four principles in ways that I think best supported and relayed my infographic.

Contrast:
I chose black, red, and white as the main colors for my infographic. These are very striking and basic colors, and make the infographic look sharp and concise. Additionally, I used two contrasting fonts, Timeless and Junebug. Timeless is a very simple serif, and I used it for non-key words and information. I chose Junebug for its puffy and fat appearance, and I put keywords and numbers in this font to contrast the Timeless. I think this displays the information in a more striking way. The title I did in fat letters called rubberneck. I only did the title in this because I think it would have been overwhelming in the main body of the picture.

Proximity:
I tried to keep things close together, and give it sort of a crowded look. I did not want to overwhelm the picture by having things too close together, but I like the closeness of the images and text. To keep things close but not too cramped, I added break lines in between some of the text and pictures.

Alignment:
I decided not to align things strictly. Most of the information is centered, and I moved the text around based on what I thought looked and flowed better.

Repetition:
I used the same symbols, such as the silhouette, and presentation of facts throughout the picture. Additionally, I used the same colors and fonts to keep things consistent.

Overall, I really enjoyed doing this infographic. It was fun to think about how I would like the information presented to me, and then try to create that image. I think my biggest decision (and challenge) was keeping it simple. There are dozens of facts, statistics, information and pictures I could have included. And while I found all of that very interesting, and made a few attempts to include more, in the end I think it would have been overwhelming. I am glad I stuck with a few basic facts, and I like the finished product.

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